Irish Songs Lyrics With Guitar Chords By Martin Dardis

The Lockout

Home
Lyrics + Chords A-B
C - F
G - J
K - M
N - R
S - T
U - Z
The Tin Whistle Song Book With Letter Notes
Sheet Music And Tin Whistle
Tin Whistle Music 2
Learning Tin Whistle
Children's Songs On Tin Whistle
Pop Songs For The Tin Whistle
Christmas Carols For The Tin Whistle
Traditional Whistle Sheet Music
The Dubliners
Christy Moore
Wolfe Tones
Fureys Brothers
Clancy Brothers And Tommy Makem
Pogues
Most Popular Songs
Dublin City Ramblers
Johnny McEvoy
Scottish Songs
Gaeilge Songs
Foster & Allen
Irish Brigade
Country And Pop
Mary Black
Derek Ryan
Eric Bogle
Corries
McCalmans
Saw Doctors
Seamus Moore
Tommy Sands
Colum Sands
Football And Hurling Songs
American Folk And Patriotic Songs
German Songs
Runrig
Charlie And The Bhoys
Big Tom
Nathan Carter Lyrics
Welsh Songs
Other Songs And Resources
Updates
Guestbook
Learn Guitar

The Lockout Song Lyrics. Written by Joe O'Sullivan.  I wrote the lyrics of the song "The Lockout" to the air of Dublin in the rare old times. I read the book Strumpet City by James Plunkett and also saw the mini series(incidentally the best that RTE has ever produced!). This and the fact that this year is the 100th anniversary of the 1913 Lockout inspired me to write something. Joe O'Sullivan
 

In  Royal Colonial Dublin town in 19 and 13
Infants died, Disease was rife, the tenements they heaved
And 20,000 workers paid for the right to link their arms
As The clergy from the pulpit preached “accept it as it stands”
Undercutting day-to-day their fellow working man
In fear of being blacklisted should they organize and stand
It was Every Fella for his own in the face of men of means
To keep their children fed and clothed, no shoes upon their feet

They Shaped and forged Our Ireland, that today we see.
The workers -  courageous and principled of 19 and 13.

Jim Larkin came from Liverpool, a city of the people
He Stood out there among them as he’d organize and lead them
Led Dockers, sailors, railwaymen -  bloodshed in Solidarity
Saw coalminers impassioned at the riots in Tonypandy.
When Big Jim came to Dublin town, his voice did spirits rise
A  glimmer of hope, A fire lit in the Dublin workers’eyes.
Uniting in great numbers, they’d strike in sympathy
For their fellow men of principle, and their stricken families

They Shaped and forged Our Ireland, that today we see.
The Workers -  courageous and  principled of 19 and 13.
 
As the movement grew successes came, and the bosses soon took note
And William Martin Murphy’s kind combined with all their might.
Union men would be dismissed, and the rest required to sign
A statement to the dire effect that they would never unionize.
The final straw had been laid on, and dissenting men locked out.
It was each for all and all for each in the face of all the odds.
They rallied in the streets as one, strikebreakers they were scourged.
The Policemen charged with truncheons, to quell an unquiet herd.

They Shaped and forged Our Ireland, that today we see.
The workers -  courageous and  principled of 19 and 13.
 
The Families helped each other through the desperate Autumn months
They scrounged and pawned and the union fund as it was would soon run out.
And mother’s of hungry children tried, to ship them across the sea
To sympathetic families there, who to their needs would see
“Apostasy!” the clergy cried, from the warmth of  presbyteries
“There’ll be No child sent and no soul lost to heathen protestant ways.”
And so the winter months would pass as the starving children cried
And worried wives and broken men, to defeat they were resigned.

They Shaped and forged Our Ireland, that today we see.
The workers -  courageous and principled of 19 and 13.
 
 The battle was lost but a blow was struck for the rights of working men
They brought the bosses to their knees, and never would they again
Attempt to go where they had gone, to preserve the status quo
The union men would come again, and the movement grew and grew
Today the red hand badge is worn as in those desperate times
By those who seek to join as one and fight for workers rights
Our needs and wants have been transformed, in the bygone century
 Let’s not forget the battle fought, in nineteen and thirteen

They Shaped and forged Our Ireland, that today we see.
The workers -  courageous and principled of 19 and 13.

rsz_1rsz_1rsz_greenwhiteorange2.jpg

Privacy Policy        Links  Copyright  2002 - 2014 Martin Dardis

rsz_1rsz_1rsz_greenwhiteorange2.jpg